Tal First

For the August Edition of Eye on Culture, the Office of International Advisement interviewed Tal First, a third year violinist from Israel. Read on to learn more about Tal’s passion for violin, his approach to adapting in NYC, and his experience with Musethica.

Tal First sitting with violin.

Tal First sitting with violin. Credit Ilan Spira.

You began your violin studies when you were six in Israel. What influences were there for you to pursue violin?

Tal playing violin as a child.

Young Tal playing violin.

I started playing the violin after attending a concert played by the school’s violin and cello teachers. I remember listening to the violin’s sound and being amazed by how beautiful it is. During lessons I loved when my teacher (Geri Ferber) demonstrated on his own violin (probably because he made the sound that I still couldn’t fully produce), and very early on he started giving me [Itzhak Perlman’s] tapes and CDs, so Itzhak Perlman quickly became a source of inspiration.

What are some of the differences you’ve noticed while studying violin in Tel Aviv compared to your time here at Juilliard?

My own mentality. These two different situations are more than just two different institutions. In Israel I studied in a music school that is part of the Tel Aviv University, so there was that. Also, I served in the army at the same time. I simply couldn’t really devote my entire life to my studies at that time. However, when I came to Juilliard everything has changed immediately: I wasn’t in the army, I wasn’t with my family, my life started being in English, I left my comfort zone. All these changes and sacrifices were made in order to achieve a new mentality: everything for the violin and music. This is the biggest difference between my time in Tel Aviv and my time here at Juilliard.

Can you explain more about the IDF for those who are unfamiliar with this commitment in Israel?

So, basically everyone in Israel has to serve in the army at the age of 18. There are many different programs and paths in the army; and, I got into what is called the “outstanding musican program”. The musicians in the program get the chance to keep practicing their instrument on a daily basis (otherwise they can’t practice regularly for 2-3 years, and that is… bad) while serving in the army.

Are there any cultural aspects in the U.S. that you weren’t fully prepared for when you first arrived for your studies?

Yes! I remember having to get used to public transportation’s existence on weekends!

What advice do you have for students who have difficulties overcoming culture differences? What have you found helpful?

Adjusting is part of us, and part of this world. Don’t be afraid from the cultural differences you notice. Remember that at the same time when you live within a new culture, your new environment is curious about you and your culture as well. So be yourself and share your own culture while you embrace others’ cultures- it goes both ways.

What do you miss most about Israel/your hometown?

Friday night dinners with my family.

Tal with his cat, Steak

Tal with his cat, Steak

Where do you suggest our readers visit in Israel?

Caesarea and Tel Aviv. Caesarea has this beautiful “old city” part that was built 2000 years ago, and in Tel Aviv you can just walk around, enjoy the unique vibes and eat some of the best food.

What do you think some of the best food is?

First of all, if you come to Israel you have to try some of the Mediterranean cuisine. We have wonderful dishes of fish, salads, hummus, falafel… Besides that, in Tel Aviv there is a large variety of restaurants of different cuisines that one should not miss.

Do you have any favorite places or things to do in NYC?

I came to NYC mainly for the cookies and banana pudding…

Can you share more about your involvement with “Musethica”?

Tal performing violin.

Tal performing violin.

Musethica is a foundation that organizes chamber concerts in places for people with special needs and circumstances. [Learn more about Musethica here: www.musethica.org/ ]They create a once-a-week-group from a few students and a teacher, and after a few days of rehearsals we go and perform in these different places for about 10 concerts in 3-4 days. I started my journey with them the year before I came to Juilliard; and, I participate in a “Musethica Week” almost every time I go back for a visit in Israel. This project is so important to me because of its unique combination of professionalism and humanity. On the one hand I receive the opportunity to play with some of the best teachers and students, dealing with stage fright, as well as pushing myself to the limits as a performer: when you have 10 concerts in such a short time, it is easier to achieve the feeling of “I have nothing to lose. Let’s try this and that”. As I got familiar with this feeling, I can now better feel it when I have a one concert opportunity as well. On the other hand, when playing for those people one can really understand the power of music. We play in many different places, such as: schools, hospitals, Alzheimer Centers, Mental Health Centers, prisons, and more. So many people in those concerts are being touched by the music in a way that we don’t see in “normal” concerts. One of my favorite memories is from when we played Mozart’s famous string quintet in G minor in an Alzheimer Center. A 90-year-old was sitting in the first row, and he was in a very late stage of the disease. The doctors told us that he used to be a professional violist. As soon as we started playing he became still, quiet. As soon as the viola came in with the famous theme he started doing the fingerings on his knee!!!!. The music gave him inner peace for a little while, and we were unbelievably moved with what we just saw.

If you were not a violinist, what do you think your life pursuits may be?

I used to play tennis quite a lot, so this might be one answer. This year I discovered my love for cooking. With some practice, this could have been another option.

Do you have any favorite tennis players?

Definitely Roger Federer. Besides the fact he is just a player from another galaxy, he seems to be charismatic, respectful, modest, and a nice person. I guess it is just very easy and natural to become his fan.

What is something that many may not know about you? Is there anything else you would like to share?

I am Israeli, but before the holocaust my entire family lived in Poland. So, I grew up with my grandparents’ polish cooking. A lot of Pierogi.

Tal with friends from Juilliard

Tal with friends!

 

 

 

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Lúa Mayenco Cardenal

For the June Edition of Eye on Culture, the Juilliard Office of International Advisement interviewed third year BFA dancer, Lúa Mayenco Cardenal. Read on to learn more about Lúa’s experiences in Madrid, her workshop “Beyond Words”, and her involvement as an Orientation Leader and in Campus Activity Board.

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Lúa poses in front of a red wall.

Do you remember your first time dancing, or experiencing dance?

I don’t have a very clear memory of my first time dancing. Growing up in a family of actors, I feel I’ve been playing around the stage since I was able to escape my crib. However, I do have a few memories of my first year at my first dance academy. I started taking dance classes when I was six years old and for some reason I took them very seriously from day one. Of course, I clearly remember my first dance performance. The academy rented a small theater for a day and we spent hours rehearsing and placing the dances on stage before the performance. What I remember the most is the wonderful chaos backstage. Our teachers kept putting our buns up, checking that we didn’t make an unrepairable mess with our make-up, while we started caring less and less about the actual dances and more about the funny costumes and running around trying to find the theater’s secrets. I also remember that my family came to see me and that I felt incredibly relieved when they told me they hated the only dance I wasn’t part of. It wasn’t so much because I wanted to be the star of the show or anything like that, it was simply because I really, really wanted to be in that piece and wear those dotted green dresses.

Can you compare your dance training in Madrid to your training here at Juilliard? Are there any highlights from these different experiences?

The last ten years of my dance training in Madrid took place at the Professional Conservatory of Dance Carmen Amaya (www.conservatoriodanza.com/). Once I entered the professional program I chose the classical dance division, where I studied to become a well-trained ballerina. If I had to choose one word to describe those years it would be HARD. I would dance from 9a.m. to 3p.m. and go to school from 4p.m. to 9:30 at night. I struggled a lot with my body because I didn’t have the ideal lines for a classic ballerina. My knees and feet weren’t curved enough and my turn out was almost non-existent. Even if my teachers sometimes doubted I could make a living as a ballet dancer, they didn’t have any other option than believing in me. My endless passion and hard work showed them I was willing to keep going despite all kinds of obstacles. That way, they gave me more and more opportunities to work and I spent my days getting what others were given naturally. By the time I got into Juilliard I knew that the greatest obstacle was already overcome: I already saw myself as a dancer and nothing would ever change that. The past two years at Juilliard have helped me find my voice as an artist. Juilliard has been opening my eyes to new ways of understanding dance since I crossed its doors. The training I receive here is not only about perfecting my technique and obtaining the tools to step into the dance world; it is about exploring the universe I’m already a part of and finding the way to navigate it. These two experiences are very different, but they couldn’t have happened without each other. I just see it as a progression, as part of my natural evolution.

When you first arrived at the Juilliard school, how was your transition to US culture? What differences between Spanish and US cultures have you noticed?

At the beginning, everything was so fast that I didn’t even have time to ask myself what I was feeling. Trying to understand what people were saying around me was already too big of a task, so I didn’t start analyzing the cultural differences until a few months after my arrival. It was a tricky and confusing process, especially because I was the only European in my class and the first Spanish dancer in the history of the dance division. We were only three international dancers in the class of 2020 and the other two were from Canada, so they had English as their first language. Finding the confidence to speak

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A milkshake, a prime example of American cuisine.

up in a culture where people are encouraged to fully develop their personal opinions from a very young age was very difficult. For the first time in the dance studio they were asking to hear my thoughts. I felt behind for almost the entire first year, but I truly learnt how to listen, and what a wonderful skill. I really missed the warmth of Spanish culture. I still miss throwing kisses all over the place and being able to hug a stranger after talking for a few minutes. Oh, I almost forgot: I had a very hard time getting used to American food. The Mediterranean diet and the time dedicated to each meal is still essential to me, and all of a sudden, those long conversations at the dining table were all gone. I truly believe all these intricate changes were essential, not to study at Juilliard, but to question my own culture and the one I was stepping into. I found adaptability, openness and comfort in all the challenges and new adventures Juilliard and the US were offering me. I would recommend 100% to throw yourself into the unknown and see the wonders of uncertainty. It’s the only way to understand the beauty of vulnerability.

Where is a place you miss most from home?

Madrid is full of magical corners. A friend from Juilliard just left after spending a couple of days in my city and it was impossible for me to condense its beauty in just two days. More than a place, what I miss the most is being able to sit outside with a bunch of friends or with my family, late at night, while we are having something to drink, until everything has been discussed at least twice. I miss the peace offered by the summer darkness of Spain and the relief of seeing the sun go down. The craziness of New York makes me miss the peace of human stillness. This is something that also Spain only has during the summer, but the memory of this feeling keeps me sane when nothing else can.

Is there an activity that you suggest folks do while in Spain?

If someone comes to Spain, they need to embrace the Spanish schedule (including the siesta time during weekends and holidays) to fully understand the country and its people. Spain has a little bit of everything, [that’s the] reason why there aren’t a lot of activities, dishes, traditions etc. that apply to all regions. If I had to suggest something, it would be visiting at least two very different cities and celebrate their diversity. Food, no matter where you go, is always tasty, different and of very good quality; they should definitely take advantage of that. Aside from this, I find fascinating the history that radiates from every single city, small town and village. The intricate past of this country makes it surprising and unique. Finally, I would like to highlight the openness of its citizens. If you come to Spain, make friends.

Is there a performance that has had a profound effect on you, or your current work?

I would be unfair if I had to point to a single performance. Since I came to Juilliard I’ve been shocked by all the possibilities offered by the contemporary dance world. Yes, I’ve seen big companies like NDT(www.ndt.nl/en/home.html), Batsheva(batsheva.co.il/en/home), CND (www.cnd.fr/fr/), Alvin Alley (www.alvinailey.org/) and others that have fascinated me with their quality of dance, imagination, and power. Yes, I’ve seen the work of unbelievable choreographers like Hofesh Shcheter, Crystal Pite, Roy Assaf or Pina Bausch that made me feel like I still was a baby dancer. However, the way these performances influenced me was letting me know that I only had to keep moving forward with availability. I want to try all, collaborate, choreograph, get lost and “fail”; just because risk is the only way to keep art alive. All these shows are reminders of how, no matter what you do, you are evolving, growing and improving.

You have recent experience as a choreographer. Can you share what you enjoy most about this, or what you think is the most challenging?

I always knew that I wanted to choreograph. I’m addicted to challenges and there is no greater one than sharing your thoughts with a hungry audience. I love it because it

Lua Dance Choreographer

Lúa prepares choreography with fellow dancers.

allows you to see your desires, concerns and joys materialized in devoted bodies. With choreography, I’m able to create art from an empty space and people who I love and respect. I give life to an ephemeral and magical scene that will always be performed in an unrepeatable way. Also, it’s another way to participate in the dance world. Dancing frees your body and soul, but choreography liberates your mind. Both things are essential to me and Juilliard gave me the option to dedicate my time to both. About the most challenging side of choreography, I would say it’s staying confident. Setting your own movement in other people, designing a particular aesthetic, directing a rehearsal. All those things require self-trust, which is not always easy to find. You are opening yourself to those who work with you and to your audience, exposing your most vulnerable self. I think this is something choreographers will never learn how to handle completely. If they don’t doubt, then, they are not challenging themselves enough. They are sticking to what they know works.  As they used to say, “A house that doesn’t change is a dead house”.

As an orientation leader, can you give our incoming Juilliard students some words of wisdom? What should they do to prepare for their experience?’

During my first week at Juilliard, they asked me to write an “expectations letter”. What was I expecting from the school? I answered I had no expectations. I wanted to let the future surprise me. Therefore, dear incoming students, don’t prepare for this experience. No matter how hard you try to visualize it, it will be different than you thought, and disappointment is a very painful feeling. My “words of wisdom” would be: stay open, embrace the days you feel homesick and lost, give yourself time to find friends, you don’t have to know who you are and “what you do”, let yourself get bored and, when you are stressed, remind yourself that everything happens at its own time. Dedication, passion and hard work will always be compensated, probably in ways you could have never imagined. There is nothing to prove. At the end of the day, the hardest judge is oneself; treat yourself well. Please, don’t be afraid of asking for help. You would be surprised of how many people are waiting to help you. Prioritize. “Yes” and “no” are both valid options. Finally, have fun and enjoy Juilliard. You can spend many years in NY, but not that many at this school full of talent.

You are currently a member of CAB, or Campus Activities Board. How do you suggest new Juilliard students, or returning students get more involved on campus? What are some accomplishments in this role that you are particularly proud of?

There is not an accurate recipe to get involved. Every student finds their own way into the Juilliard Community, starting with what comes naturally to them. However, what I believe is always useful and fulfilling, is to open yourself to new connections. The best resource at Juilliard is its students. Talented artists from all around the world meet in the city of New York just for a few years of their lives; we better enjoy their company. Through that desire of expanding my knowledge through others, I found my way into CAB. The Campus Activity Board gives me an excuse to get closer to those who are sharing a time of growth and discovery with me. After one year in such an amazing team, I look back and I feel proud of all those events that gave our friends an opportunity to simply laugh in company of their loved ones or their future loved ones. Furthermore, feeling the support and trust of the community is a motivation to keep challenging my personal limits. I feel proud of the new ideas I introduced into the CAB team through unusual events like the “Juilliard Assassin Game” or the “Capture the Penguin” for the Juilliard Spirit Day. I feel grateful for all the amazing experiences this school has offered me; getting involved is only a way to give back part of that joy. If you want to actively be a part of this community, keep sharing what inspires you in whatever way you feel comfortable with.

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Lúa with CAB members visiting Dyker Heights holiday lights.

You are founder and director of a movement workshop called, “Beyond Words”. Can you tell us a little more about this program, and what motivated you to create this workshop?

After my first year at Juilliard I realized I had been focusing on my personal growth for far too long. I felt the need to share my knowledge and the tools that had helped me change all aspects of my life. I wanted to bring the power of dance to those who had never been exposed to the liberation of physical movement, and that way, the idea of “Beyond Words” first came to my mind. After a year of brainstorming and careful planning, I decided to create a one-week summer workshop for Spanish kids between the ages of 10 and 12. I wanted them to start considering physicality as part of their personality, including movement in their daily vocabulary and expanding their possibilities to express themselves. It was the first time I tried to create a program from scratch and I can’t deny it took a lot of time and effort; nevertheless, we made it happen. In two weeks from now, me and my Andalusian partner Margarita López, are meeting a delightful group of twelve kids in one of the public schools of Madrid. For five days we’ll dive into the movement universe, playing with the basics of dance and helping them to find comfort and support on their bodies. I can’t wait to see the magic happen.

Now that you’ve been in NYC for a bit, and have been involved in the community, can you share what you like most about NYC or the Juilliard community?

As I mentioned before, what I love the most about the Juilliard community is its students. I’ve been able to discover a whole new universe through the ideas and experiences of those around me. All of a sudden, I discovered the power of combining inspirations, projects, talent and resources. I feel supported and encouraged by all my friends and teachers. They taught me how to fly, accepting the fall as part of the adventure; I don’t know, I simply love collaborating and being part of a greater piece of art.

Lua FlowerAbout NYC, it could be described as a continuous exchange of information. There is always something going on, which is simultaneously a blessing and a curse if you are the kind of person who hates missing out. As Frank Sinatra used to say, “If you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere”. Well, that’s exactly how I feel. I love how the city pushes you to always keep moving and improving, even if sometimes it takes you to exhaustion. New York is one of the few cities able to gather the best minds in a few blocks. I would have never, EVER, guessed that at the age of 18 I would be living in the city that never sleeps and discovering myself in its unique mess.

Is there anything else you would like to share?

I would like to thank the Office of International Advisement for this opportunity to share my experience at Juilliard. Because of my financial situation, I would have never believed I was going to complete two entire school years at this school. Feeling the support of this institution gives me the strength to keep fighting for my dreams. Thank you for everything.

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Lúa enjoying the sites of New York City.

Arash Noori

For the Office of International Advisement’s May edition of Eye-on-Culture, Arash Noori (www.arashnoorimusic.com/) was interviewed. A graduate student in the historical performance program, Arash is a lutist/guitarist born in Tehran, Iran, who is now a Canadian citizen. Read on to learn more about Arash’s love of Monteverdi, his experience with Juilliard415, and the steps he is taking to be more health-conscious.

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Arash Noori with guitar

You are an accomplished guitarist/lutist. What are some of your first memories of these instruments?

My older brother of 5 years had begun taking piano lessons, when I was about two and a half/three years old, and it was at his teacher’s house that I had my first conscious encounter with the guitar. We had gone by to drop off (or pick up…I don’t remember) my brother for a lesson and there was guitar just laying around this teacher’s studio…and I just couldn’t help but to go over for a closer look. It was like a magnet; I went on over picked it and started strumming away. Luckily no one yelled at me to stop…I wonder if I would have become a musician if they had!

You have won many international competitions, and have been described as “the compelling guitarist” by the New York Times. What do you believe makes your music compelling? Can you tell us your secrets?

Hah. Well, the New York Times quote (https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/14/arts/music/review-cantanta-profana-revives-a-henze-cycle-inspired-by-german-poems.html) comes from a review of a performance of Hans Werner Henze’s Kammermusik, a work that I had been wanting to perform for years. It’s a difficult piece to put together; difficult for all instruments of the chamber orchestra, nearly an hour long, with a devilishly difficult tenor part…it’s almost impossible to manage to put together within the confines of the “chamber music program” of even the finest music schools. I finally had a chance to perform the work with some of my closest friends and favorite musicians, the Cantata Profana Ensemble (www.cantataprofana.com/) and the remarked tenor Tom Cooley (www.thomascooley.com). So how is this for a recipe for a successful performance: find a work that you feel strongly about (kind of work that makes your creative and performance impulses fire on all cylinders), add years of anticipation and ruminating until you finally get a chance to perform it, and surround yourself with dear friends and amazing musicians to do so…and I think the odds are that the resulting performance will be pretty darn “compelling.”

You have completed degrees at Yale, and the University of Toronto. Can you tell about your shift from these institutions to Juilliard? Have you noticed any differences? My training at Juilliard has been by far the most focused—accumulating a ton of professional-level performance experience with world-class directors. By the time we’re through with hours of rehearsals, coachings and performances, gosh, there isn’t much time for anything else. My undergraduate experience at University of Toronto was a reasonably well-rounded liberal arts education with a concentration on music; I was a classical guitarist at Yale which meant a lot of independent practice time and a chance to take in as much as one can on the very special and lively campus. The Historical Performance program at Juilliard has definitely been the most intense training I’ve received.

Can you tell us more about why you decided to pursue a graduate degree in historical performance? I simply fell in love with lutes and early guitars…I mean obsessive. As well as the music that goes along with the instruments; particularly the music of Claudio Monteverdi is very close to my heart. He’s my desert-island composer for sure. I just had to pursue further my training in the field given my love for the music and the instruments and the HP program at Juilliard is the gold standard.

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Arash Noori performing on lute.

 

I’ve seen photos of Juilliard415 online, and it seems like everyone has a lot of fun traveling! What are some of your best experiences being part of this group?

Gosh, at the risk of sounding corny, I will say that every project we do is special; this is a special ensemble and an incredibly special program. But I must say that the “Genius of Monteverdi” program that we did under the direction of William Christie in October of 2017 will be the one that I’ll carry with me with vivid memories for a long time. Everything about the project was seemingly tailor-made for me to have an experience of lifetime: I’ve already mentioned my love for the music of Claudio Monteverdi, the repertoire selection—mainly from the 8th book of madrigals “Madrigals of War and Love”—and working with one of my favorite musicians on the planet, William Christie…this was just a dream come true. And to top it all off, Maestro Christie didn’t conduct the project but rather led from harpsichord, playing basso continuo. And as a basso continuo player on lute-family instruments , I got to play along with him. Without getting too technical about the process, it’s analogous to being in a “band”; it’s that kind of improvisatory music making where you have to be very aware of each other—being reactive and supportive to one another as well as whomever you’re accompanying (in this case, our wonderful singers from the vocal arts program)…when you get it right and are playing with expressive and communicative musicians, there is nothing quite like it. It’s fun, spontaneous, creative and exciting and I still really can’t believe that I got to do it with one of the best, ever, William Christie…you know, we were in a “continuo band” together 🙂

What are some things that many people may not know about you?

That I was raised in Iran until the age of 12. My Iranian/Canadian background is no secret but even some of my close friends forget that I was raised in in Iran until I was almost a teenager. I’m not quite sure why; I suspect it’s because of the absence of an accent, or rather the presence of a strong Canadian accent which people detect more readily than a Persian accent…I sound like I was born and raised in Saskatoon and only left yesterday, so people forget that I went through all of elementary school in Iran. I used to think that the Canadian accent is myth; I didn’t hear much of a difference in the way that I and my American friends talked, but having discovered the field of Historical Performance entirely in the United States as a graduate student, and having encountered certain words for the first time with an American accent, when I go home and I hear a Canadian HP colleague say “viola da gamba,” I say to myself “oh boy…there is a Canadian accent… and it’s strong!”

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Performing and teaching primarily the music of the 17th and 18th century; sharing the joy of everything that I think is so incredibly special about this repertoire.

I have heard that you have some strong opinions in regards to probiotics, can you share more with us?

Well, let me start by saying that I love being an instrumentalist—and that I love practicing as much as I do—but one realizes sooner or later that it’s not necessarily the healthiest lifestyle. And I was getting to a point where I was beginning feel the negative the health effects of being an instrumentalist at a high level and I made a choice to start being more health-conscious. And the only way that I could do this was to actually treat the matter as a hobby, rather than some thing that I “should do.” Chores are not sustainable with me, so I tried to have fun with it. And it’s an easy thing to do with all the good material that is now available online, from accomplished, accredited experts who choose to share a wealth of information on blogs and podcasts etc.; it’s really incredible. So it’s not that I’m following health “fads”; the people that I that I read and listen to are noted, published experts. It’s become very much so fun; I like keeping an eye out for information, “super foods” and recipes. Recently I’ve become interested in probiotics—simply put, beneficial bacteria that you carry in your gut that can help regulate and strengthen the immune system along with many other health benefits— and realizing that fermented foods are the best source of getting more of these probiotics inside you, I bought a fermentation kit and started making my own sauerkraut! I haven’t been brave enough to attempt kimchi yet but I’ll get there. It’s taken me a while to get any good at making sauerkraut itself; the first couple of batches were, well, not good! In any case, sauerkraut the side I’ve become so fond of this new passion/hobby and I genuinely enjoy doing it; it’s a nice break away from the profession of playing and practicing and it’s an enjoyable way of remedying some of the negative health effects of being a professional musician.

 

Cesar Parreno

For this March edition of Eye on Culture, the Office of International Advisement spoke to César Parreño.  César is a first year vocalist from Guayaquil, Ecuador. Read on to learn about César’s quick stint in business school, his experience coming to the US, and his true love, Sasha, his dog.

Cesar and his dog, Sasha

Can you share with us the first time you were involved in the vocal arts?

I’ve always enjoyed singing, ever since I was a kid; [I] didn’t know that singing would end up being my profession. My mom tells a story that [she] once saw a 1-year-old toddler (me) singing and dancing to a music video on TV. My mom interpreted those mumblings, and probably not so pretty sounds, as singing and since then she knew I liked [music]. At around 10 she signed me up [for] a music school back home, and there I had my first lessons. I stopped around 2 years later.

Why did you stop?

I quit for a while after a horrible performance. I always kept singing in my high school’s band. We performed in events throughout the year, but it was always pop, rock, or Latin music, not classical at all. Then high school ended and I didn’t quite know what I wanted to do with my life, so by default I started business school back home. Because it was really close by, I started taking lessons with my teacher back home, Beatriz Parra. There, I started taking lessons and almost immediately joined their choir (http://www.facebook.com/corocallas). Eventually, music started [to steal] me away. In Ecuador classical arts [don’t] have the space they deserve. It is very difficult to have a career as an opera singer when the classical environment is so [limited]. Saying that it is challenging and against the norm is an understatement. Years passed and I realized I didn’t enjoy business. I was only taking the liberal arts courses and avoiding the business core. I allowed myself to accept the fact that I could indeed have a chance in studying classical singing and [make] it my profession. I have to admit, the choir and the environment of artists I spent time with was one of the most determining factors in my decision.

I  always wanted to study abroad. I have to confess I didn’t know about conservatories and music schools in the U.S., I heard of Juilliard before, so I went online and googled: “Best music schools/conservatories in the US” browsed around 3 lists, picked and researched my 4 favorites, [then] applied. Just like that. I didn’t know about any specific teacher I wanted to study with; I didn’t know anyone from there; I just did it. Talk about crazy things, right?

Can you tell us your relationship with music and the arts as you were growing up?

While growing up and during high school I thought of music as a hobby. I never really thought about it as a career until I actually dropped business school. I didn’t really have a person to look up to. I am the first professional musician in my family, too. My parents don’t really listen to classical music at all. I was never exposed to a real artistic community. This is why the choir was so important to me. It gave me a little taste of the musician community. Culturally, being a musician is not a “regular” career choice, thankfully my parents saw my potential, and have been supporting me every step of the way.

Do you mind sharing any information about your family and pets?

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Cesar and his family

Of course, I don’t! I am the elder of two brothers. My younger brother’s name is Sergio. He is currently in high school and not worried with the “What will I do with my life?!” dilemma yet. My dad’s name is Patricio (actually César Patricio, but lets not talk about that) he works in an insurance company. Funny thing, he loves soccer and almost all sports, while I don’t. We both enjoy action TV shows though! And last but not least, my mom, Katia. She is a dentist. She has her own office and we talk A LOT. It’s our favorite hobby. She is also a really musical person! She enjoys music and always wanted to learn how to play piano. Her dad, Pablo, is also a singer at heart. You can always hear him sing around his house, and even recorded a CD with two guitar accompaniment! I guess I got the love of music from my mom’s side!

I have a cat named Juana; she is not that friendly. She will sometimes just run to you and bite you. But we love her anyway. However, the real star of the show is my Pekingese dog, Sasha. She is the best dog ever, period. She is super calm and really enjoys human company. She would follow me around everywhere and would let anyone pick her up for a long time (as long as you pet her). She is also a terrific hunter. Just wanted to let you know. Don’t be jealous.

You’ve had many performances already in your career, do you have any favorites? Or any that have been particularly meaningful to you?

Of course, 3 come to mind.

The first one is a really big performance celebrating the city’s (Guayaquil) anniversary in which I was hired to sing one of the main roles. It was also the inauguration of a giant statue in the middle of the city. This giant even had a full orchestra and was live-streamed on TV and social media! It was a huge thing! I’m so happy I was a part of it!

The second one is when the choir I was in (in spirit I still am) went to Peru to an international choir festival. We had so much fun traveling and going to Machu Pichu and gasping for breath at 11,152 feet over ocean level! It was an unforgettable experienced singing with my friends and traveling to do music outside Ecuador!

And the last one is the one I hold dearest to my heart. It was during the final performance of the classical singing international festival (http://www.facebook.com/festivalsantiagodeguayaquil) organized by my teacher, Beatriz Parra. This was the last performance I had before moving to the states to start my studies [at] Juilliard. As you can imagine, emotions were high. My final song was “No puede ser”, [a heavily emotional piece] by Pablo Sorozábal.  At the end I hit that long, final A. I see my friends and family’s faces, smiling, clapping, cheering. And I lost it. I tried bowing with a smile, but my face started trembling. I started crying. I resumed full crying backstage. It was not as much happiness that I was leaving, it was more of a sense of accomplishment, closure if you may. That will be one of my most treasured memories. Because it had all that was important to me; music, friends and family, all in one place, all in one moment.

Cesar on stage

You currently are an active participant on campus and in the residence hall. Which events have been your favorite so far this school year?

Oh so many to pick from. I have to admit I enjoy all diversity dialogues. I’m always surfing through science videos in youtube, and diversity dialogues are like those but interactive and with people! In the residence hall I loved geek movie night with people from the Geek Coalition! We watched Galaxy Quest and I loved every minute of it! Another one of my favorites was Breakfast and Cartoons. Had two of my favorite things: cereal and cartoons. What else could I ask for?

Your hometown is Portoviejo, even though your family lives in Guayaquil. Can you explain your relationships with both places? Are there any cultural differences?

It’s funny because I always say I’m from Manabi, Portoviejo. Even though I used to live in Guayaquil since I was 2/3 years old. I wouldn’t say there is much of a cultural difference though. A good thing that comes from being from two different places its that you get to travel during Holidays!Cesar and friends in Ecuador

Ecuador has experienced many challenges recently politically, and environmentally. Can you explain what this is like?

Sadly, 2 years ago my hometown was devastated by an earthquake. A lot of people around the upper west coast lost their lives. This made the economy more challenging than it was for me and my family, given that we had to help family that lost their homes back in Portoviejo. Things are looking much better now. One day, Portoviejo will be back better than ever.

Can you compare life in NYC to Guayaquil?

I’ve always lived in a big city, so its not that different. Funny thing, for me the transition from Guayaquil to NYC was not that harsh (if at all) it just felt like: “Welp, I’m here. Let’s get to business.” I also never felt quite like home in Guayaquil, I was always lacking something, and I think I’m still looking for it.

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As you’ve shared before, Ecuador does not have as developed of an opera culture as other countries. How was the transition (musically) from Ecuador to Juilliard?

It was overwhelming. I came from a place where we did a couple of opera scene shows, but nothing too big. I am not that familiar with the classical music world yet. Coming to Juilliard showed me how much more music there was to listen to and how many stories were told through music. It was a humbling, exciting, and overwhelming sensation. I also didn’t have any music theory or ear training back home.

Although opera is not a tradition in Ecuador, what are the other musical or art-related traditions?

Being from the city I’m afraid I am not that familiar with more rural traditions of Ecuador. However in Ecuador the Pasillo is a very popular song genre. I’m also very fond of it because It was in a Pasillo competition when I first won a singing competition! I remember making the artistic decision of ending the song knelling in the stage for dramatic effect. My young self knew that I was supposed to be a singer, I don’t know why I didn’t listen to 12 hear old me!

Cesar's choir in performanceWhere do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years? 25?!

I really have no idea. I don’t even know how the classical music world works yet. I do know I want to make my family and my country proud. Although, I do know I want to travel and sing all around the world. Hopefully one day *crosses fingers*.

Is there anything else you would like to use this space to share?

I just want to let everybody who loves music [know] that they should never discard music as an option for a career. It is never too late to start singing. You never know what might happen and people who know about music might see something inside you that you don’t know is there yet. Always give yourself a chance.

Cesar on a hike

 

 

 

Thapelo Masita

For the Office of International Advisement’s February Eye-on-Culture, Thapelo Masita was interviewed. Thapelo is a first year graduate student studying cello from Blomfontein, South Africa. Read on to learn about his experiences touring with KZN Philharmonic (http://www.kznphil.org.za), studying in the United States,  and his brief stint as a violinist.

Thapelo Masita

According to my sources, you started playing cello when you were 12. What were your musical experiences previous to the cello?

Before cello, I played violin for about a year. I switched to cello because I still sounded horrible on violin after a year. My friends were getting better than me on violin so, I went to the director of our program and asked to start cello. He agreed and when I got home, I told my parents that I had graduated from the small one to the big one. Being non-musicians they were proud and surprised.

How do your parents feel about your pursuit of music?

Both my mother and father were very supportive from the beginning, they both love music. In fact my mother used to be the choir conductor for many years.

You’ve studied music at various institutions, such as, Interlochen (http://www.interlochen.org), and Eastman (http://esm.rochester.edu) before coming to Juilliard. How have these experiences shaped your current studies?

I don’t think I would have been able to survive Juilliard’s intensity had I not had these two prior experiences. Interlochen was a safe place in the middle of the woods where I had independence but still a lot of guidance. Eastman is really where I did most of my growing and made friends for life. Having been at these schools, I have developed personally and I just know more people. As a result, living in a big city like New York doesn’t feel so alienating because I have had 5 years to make friends, many of whom have ended up in New York.

You’ve played with a multitude of orchestras in the United States, and in South Africa. Can you tell us more about these different experiences and how they have influenced your current work?

I was fortunate enough to get my first real professional orchestra gig right after Interlochen. I went on tour with the KZN Philharmonic one of the top orchestras on the African continent. We toured France for two weeks to celebrate Nelson Mandela. It was some of the best fun I’ve ever had and also eye opening. This tour taught me what it really means to be prepared in the professional world. I take that lesson with me everywhere I go. I was also principal cellist of the Bochabela String Orchestra (http://bochabela.com) which was the main training ground for me in terms of playing in a section and leading. BSO is the flagship ensemble of the Mangaung String Project (http://www.musicinafrica.net/directory/mangaung-string-programme), an outreach project in Bloemfontein, South Africa which teaches classical music to children from previously disadvantaged communities.

Thapelo with string quartet colleagues

Can you tell me more about the Mangaung String Project? How did you first get involved?

The Mangaung String Project started in the 90’s in Bloemfontein after the American bassist Peter Guy, who had recently moved there realized that children in South African townships had no access to classical music. So he decided to start teaching a group of 5 students at Bochabela Primary School in Bloemfontein. Today the program has over 500 students in several cities near Bloemfontein.

I was first introduced to the program when I was 11. They came to my primary school to give an outreach concert and offer lessons to students who were interested. Many children applied to study.  It was fun. We all had to start on violin but after a few months I switched to cello because it was big and I had become tired of the violin sound.

You speak SIX languages! Have you have ever experienced a linguistic mix-up?

The differences between Sesotho and Setswana can sometimes be tricky to navigate but other than that, no. Although the six languages is a little unusual, most people in South Africa speak at least three languages proficiently by the end of high school.

Can you tell us what your favorite place is in your hometown? Why is it your favorite?

I have too many to speak of in this instance, but I can tell you that a place I go to most often,  is the music school where our program is based. It has been my home since I was 11 when I started violin. I spent all my afternoons and Saturdays there until I moved to America. Some of the most vivid memories in my life were made there. I also love the chaos at the school there children playing everywhere, teachers trying to get them to practice and just a general joy about the place. I really love it.

Thapelo by a river in South Africa

What are some cultural differences you’ve noticed from South Africa, the United States, and other places you have traveled to? How has the adjustment to these cultural differences been? Do you have a story of a funny cultural misunderstanding?

So many.  But perhaps the most surprising [difference] when I first arrived in the US and [actually] in my travels to Europe, is how people relate to one another in the western countries. In South Africa, people are so much more open and speak to and empathise with one another so much more easily I find. We call this the principal of Ubuntu. It is difficult to translate this but it essentially means humanity; an understanding that we are because our neighbour is. Adjusting has been fine for me thus far.

What is the biggest misconception about South Africa that you’ve experienced?

In America, people think all South Africans speak either Afrikaans or Zulu. This could be for a multitude of reasons but South Africa has 11 official languages all which are distinct and independent. These languages have their own rich  histories and literature that is specific to each tribe which the language originates from.

For those of us who know less about South Africa, can you give us a little more information about the people and cultures of South Africa? Or, do you know where we should start our own research?

Well, where to start with this… South Africa has 11 official languages. Nine of these languages are these tribal languages, Sesotho, Setswana, Sepedi, I s’Xhosa, I siZulu, Venda, Ndebele, Swati and Tsonga. The other two are English and Afrikaans which came to our people through colonization, English from the Brits and Afrikaans because of the Dutch.

There is a saying in Sesotho which says, “Motho ke motho ka batho.” This roughly translate[s] to, “a person is a person because of other people.” I believe this saying exists in all the languages of the South African tribes. This idea is central to our beliefs and South Africans are more compassionate and open as a result. We are by no means perfect, but every foreigner I have met seemst to feel the same way about South African people of all races and cultures.

Thapelo's family

You’ve traveled pretty extensively, where is one place that you not had the opportunity to visit yet, and would like to go to, and why?

This changes throughout the year for me but recently I have made a few  wonderful friends from Puerto Rico, Venezuela and Colombia. They have told me fascinating stories about their cultures, food and abundant nature in their countries. I would love to go and experience it myself.

Thapelo with Eastman faculty Steven Doane and Rosemary ElliottNow that you’ve studied in the United States for over 5 years, what advice would you give to a student who wants to study away from home for the first time?

Try your best to have an open mind at all times. Living overseas, one meets people who have had lives so different from one’s own that it can be difficult to relate to people. Don’t be deterred by that, it should make you want to learn more about the many different ways people have found to deal with this thing we call life.

According to Instagram, you’ve spent time with some very interesting peoThapelo6ple. Do you have any favorites?  

I might sound like a bore but, that will always be my beloved mother. She was the queen and I miss her always.

If you could have any professional job at Juilliard (President, admissions, working in the international student office), which would it be?

I love the idea of leading a school and helping to create the best possible environment for students to learn. So I would say President but I also really want to play in the Juilliard quartet so I guess I’ll have to say those two jobs.

Do you have any hidden talents that you would like to share?

I sang a lot when I was with the Bochabela String Orchestra. It was fun, I still enjoy singing.

 

 

Can Wang

For November, the Office of International Advisement engaged with Can Wang, a third year student in the dance program from Jinan, Shandong, China.  Read on to learn more about her love of piano and the arts, her experience as a student leader, and her advice for other international students.

Can Wang in performance

According to our sources, piano inspired your beginnings in dance. Can you tell us more about how your study of piano and dance have intertwined, and created the performer you are today? 

I started consciously being influenced and attracted by music and dance at the age of 3. I fell in love with the sound of the piano when I heard it in the kindergarten for the first time, and I told my mom that I wanted to learn it (I didn’t know the instrument is called “piano”. My mom figured it out after she went to see the piano in the kindergarten). My parents bought the piano for me when I was 4 years old, and I became the first kid that plays the piano in my neighborhood ( because neither playing instruments nor dance are popular in my neighborhood back then, but now there are more and more kids that are playing instruments and dancing). I was taking dance class in kindergarten too. When the piano and dance started to co-exist in my life, I would improvise dance for the piano music I listened to, and improvise on the piano for the dance I learned. It seemed natural to me to connect them, and they became my best friends.

Playing the piano at a young age not only enhanced my sensitivity for music, but also helped me build my patience, which are a very important skill to have for a dancer. No matter what I do—choreograph, dance or teach, patience and sensitivity for music are always there to allow me to explore deeper into the possibilities, and come up with new ideas.

You’ve have previously performed works by Andrea Miller, Helen Simoneau, Katarzyna Skarpetowska, Nacho Duato, Janis Brenner, Jacqulyn Buglisi, Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Michael Parmenter, and Jose Limon. Did any of these experiences have a strong impact on you? And if so, how?

Those experiences are significant to my study at Julliard. Working with choreographers and studying repertoires broaden my understanding of dance. There are many reasons to dance, and dance works are made from questioning “why we dance”. Choreographers and rehearsal directors come into the studio and share their interests and questions with us, and we start to explore and develop dance works altogether. As we are on stage, the dance works become languages we use to communicate with audience.

Can Dance 2

In addition to your pursuit of contemporary dance and ballet, you have skills in Chinese traditional dance. For our readers who are not familiar with this form of dance, could you please tell us more about how it is characterized and the style? How have you worked background in Chinese Traditional dance into your work now?

When I was in China, I’ve studied Tai Chi and Chinese traditional dance. Chinese traditional dance is consisted of Chinese folk dance and Chinese classical dance. There are 6 different types in Chinese folk dance which are symbolic of each geography, climate, daily labor, agriculture and religion. Each type of Chinese folk dance has its own temperament, and a lot of the movements have specific meanings because they are manifestations of their daily life.

Chinese classical dance is a revival of ancient Chinese dance. It was mixed with the gestures and postures of Chinese martial arts and Chinese opera, and it emphasizes the use of the focus and coordination of the movement and breath. Similar to Tai chi, the movements are the result of the flow of the energy which are usually circles in different directions and dimensions.

The influence from Chinese traditional dance is strong and visible when I dance and choreograph. The movement patterns are deeply remembered by my body. As soon as my body moves, it would repeat the patterns naturally and unconsciously.

It seems that you’ve had many years of experience of working with teenage dancers in Beijing, how did you become involved with this educational outreach program? What do you like about this program?

Working with teenage dancers and performing with National Ballet of China for their annual educational outreach program are two separate activities I did in China. When I was studying at the secondary school of Beijing Dance Academy (http://www.bda.edu.cn/english/index.htm), the National Ballet of China needed young dancers to perform with the company for their outreach program while half of the company was on tour. It was a performance we give in colleges and universities all around China. It included lecture on the history of Ballet and also history of Ballet in China, followed by the performance of excerpts from the Western and Chinese Ballet repertoires in a chronicle order. I loved the idea of bringing ballet into campuses to make it accessible for young audiences.

I began working with young dancers when I was a teenage dancer myself. My dance teacher from my hometown Jinan, has always encouraged me to help dancers who are younger than me. I’ve been going back to my teacher’s studio every summer since I was ten, and the students I’ve helped are now professional dancers studying in the secondary schools and dance academies, and working in ballet companies in China and abroad. This past summer, I created two contemporary dance solos for two 12-year-old male dancers for their school’s competition, and I rehearsed a ballet variation for two 13-year-old female dancers for their school’s showing. I’ve been learning immensely from the young dancers I’ve worked with in China. It helps me to refresh and reorganize the knowledge that has been increased in me throughout training and education from different culture. It gives me opportunities to practice my observation and communication with individual dancers, and it makes me feel grateful for the education I’ve had and also responsible for sharing what I’ve learned to the young dancers.

You were an Orientation Leader this year. What prompted you to apply? What was the best part of the orientation leader experience for you? What would you suggest to students who may like to apply to become OLs next year?

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Photo by Matthew Quigley

 

When I was a freshman, my first impression of Juilliard was from the orientation leaders. I remember how excited and helpful they were, which made me to be an orientation leader since then.

Being an OL is amazing and challenging experience to me. I learned that I have to think about both positions of being a freshman and an OL before making a decision, so that I can really understand them before helping them with their needs. It also offers a time and space for me to discover what my strengths are as a leader and how I can function in the OL community to make the orientation successful.

To the new OLs: to understand what type of leader you are is equally important as being supportive and selfless in the OL community. Make yourself available for helping new students and let them know that you are happy to be here with them.

In addition to being an OL, you are now a colloquium mentor. What are some of the benefits of colloquium? What is something that you learned? What do you like about being a mentor?

Can Friends

Hiking with friends at Hudson Valley.

I think colloquium peer mentor serves a similar goal as the OL, which is to help first-time undergraduate students adjust their new life at Juilliard. What’s unique about being a colloquium peer mentor is that I’m connecting the faculty and new students, like a trail that connects the top and the bottom of a mountain. It’s hard to get to the mountain top while standing on the bottom and vise versa, but it becomes achievable when there’s a trail in between. I like being supportive, and I enjoy being trusted by people. It was necessary to let new students know that I’m here for them when they need me.

If you were a tour guide of your hometown, which places and what things do you think we should see and do?

 

My hometown is Jinan which is the capital city of Shandong Province (Shandong is also the hometown for the philosopher Confucius and the China’s First Lady Ms. Peng). Jinan is also the “city of springs” as there are 72 springs in the city. It is also why Jinan hasn’t had a subway system, because the government wants to protect the springs underneath the ground.

Can Family

Can teaching her grandma how to use an iPad.

In Jinan, you can visit the natural and historical attractions such as Bao Tu Spring, Qian Fo Mountain/Mountain of Thousand Buddha, Da Ming Lake; eat great food on Fu Rong Street; go to see acrobatic performances of Shandong Acrobatic Troupe and Quyi— a performance art consisted of narrative storytelling, staged monologue and dialogue; shopping and going to movie theaters can be a pleasant and overwhelming experience too.

What is a difference that was shocking to you when you first arrived in the US? Where is your favorite place in NYC?

As I was living in Beijing for school for many years, the tall buildings and city-like life style of NYC didn’t surprise me much. The most shocking and confusing things are the intangible things such as relearning people’s body language and facial expression, processing a different language all day long, interpreting people’s humor, trying to remember the names of people, class, food, concepts and objects, learning the rules of different social situations, understanding a different value system, rediscovering who I am in a new place…I’m still learning to understand them while I’m constantly confused by them. At the beginning, I felt overwhelmed by even the simplest things in my life, and it was so hard to catch them up. Since there hasn’t been Chinese dancers at Juilliard, I understood that it’s my responsibility to learn from the base, and to give myself time to catch things up little by little. I’ve been learning and growing immensely from this process, and I know that I’m in a place where it allows me to be patient with myself and make mistakes, so that I can calmly go through confusions and learn from mistakes.

My favorite places:

MOMA, the MET Museum, Angelika Film Center, Chelsea Market, Highline Park, Chinatown, Korean Town

 

Can with an ice-cream filled treat

Where do you envision yourself in 5 years, 10 years, 20 years?

In 5 years: Intensely dancing and performing in the US or Europe in order to be familiar with the operation of a professional dance world.

In 10 years: Keep deepening my discovery as a dancer and performer, get a master degree on dance in the US or Europe, to prepare myself for being a teaching artist.

In 20 years: Keep dancing in the US or Europe, and hopefully I can start teaching in China a few times a year to share what I’ve learned throughout my career.

If you were not a dancer, what do you think you would pursue instead?

When I was 4 years old, my mom asked me: “do you want to be a pianist in the future?” I said “yes of course!” Then my mom asked: “if you want to be a pianist, you will have to work hard to go to Juilliard, so that you will be a wonderful pianist to perform all over the world.” I said “oh yes, I want to go to Juilliard to be the best pianist in the world!”

In this case, I probably would pursue a career as a pianist if I didn’t dance. But I also wanted to be a diplomat when I was in elementary school because I really liked English.

Can

Reflecting on your time here at Juilliard, what is some advice you would give new international students?

Be open to the new world and be patient with yourself.

If you make mistakes, have fun with them! They will be your teachers to guide you to a better place. And don’t forget that there are many people who are happy to help you.

Trust that your identity is your energy source and backup. It makes you become who you are today, and it’s always a reference for you while you are adjusting to a new life.

Learn everything from everywhere and everyone, not only in your class and practice room, because everyone is an artist nowadays. What defines you as an artist is how you live your life and whether you’ve developed your own life style.

Can Personal Collage

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katarzyna Kluczykowska

For the August edition of Eye on Culture, the Office of International Advisement interviewed Katarzyna Kluczykowska, a second year graduate student in Juilliard’s Historical Performance program. Born in Krakow, Poland, and raised in Warsaw, Katarzyna studied music in Poland and Germany before receiving a Fulbright Scholarship (https://foreign.fulbrightonline.org/) to continue studying the harpsichord at Juilliard.  Read on to learn more about Katarzyna’s experience as an early music musician, world traveler, and Juilliard student.

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You began studying piano at six years old. When did you begin to play the harpsichord and what made you decide to focus on the harpsichord rather than the piano?

I began to play the harpsichord when I was 19 years old. I decided to focus on the harpsichord because I simply fell in love in its sound and its touch and also it opened up a new world of the early music repertoire for me. I was totally amazed and enchanted by its charm.

For those readers less familiar with the Historical Performance program, can you explain how it compares to programs focused on contemporary classical music?

The Historical Performance program focuses on the early music repertoire, mainly on the 17th and 18th century. It is very intense and extremely fascinating- we have the opportunity to participate in very interesting projects with the biggest experts in the early music world, for instance Masaaki Suzuki, Jordi Savall or William Christie, just to name a few. We play a lot of chamber music, much more than solo repertoire. Nevertheless, as a harpsichordist I have the opportunity and pleasure to work with three great teachers- Peter Sykes, Béatrice Martin and Richard Egarr. It is a big honor to have lessons with such amazing musicians who have very strong opinions about historical performance practice. We also have many symposiums with both performing musicians and musicologists which are inspiring and helpful. Not to mention history of 17th and 18th century music lessons which give us a lot of important information, but also serve as a platform for us to share questions and doubts.  All of HP students learn how to deal with basso continuo practice which is essential for baroque chamber music. We play on copies of periodic instruments what enables us to sound lighter and livelier and more authentic.

Do you feel there are any misconceptions about early music? If so, please describe.13528060_934978609944143_8936552780574506240_o

I think for some people the early music might be hard to interpret. Most of the time the pieces have no dynamic markings, they are filled with a lot of ornaments, and this is only the beginning of all troubles. Obviously we do not have recordings of musicians from that era so unfortunately we can’t hear how they played then, how they sounded. We can copy their instruments, but it is hard to copy their performance practice. But with help of numerous sources, we can try to imagine how they worked and how they understood their music. I think that nowadays there is more and more musicians interested in the whole context of music-making, not only from renaissance and baroque, but also from classic and romantic period. It is important not to just look at the score and play all the notes, but try to understand deeper layers of the piece and the cultural and historical influences. What I like about playing early music is that sometimes we can perform totally forgotten pieces which beauty and style can transport us a view centuries back.

Even though your studies at Juilliard are focused on early music, you have said that you are also “fascinated” by contemporary music. Can you elaborate?

14114929_978404512268219_8650807268655422190_oI started to play harpsichord mainly because I truly love this instrument. After my huge obsession for early music there came a time for the contemporary music. It was my need to discover and play the whole repertoire written for harpsichord in its entirety– contemporary music is very varied and colorful and gives one opportunity to learn contemporary musical language. Musicians in the baroque era only played contemporary music, they didn’t perform early music. To understand their attitude I consider playing pieces written today as a must. We always dream to have the chance to ask composers who died a long time ago about their pieces and style. But very often we miss the opportunity to work with living composers which can be a huge adventure. There are around 10,000 pieces written for harpsichord in the 20th and 21st century. I don’t see any reason why we should not play them and focus only on the early repertoire. We can support with all our heart the forgotten music and give its justified place, but still participate in creating new pieces. When I was studying in Hamburg, Germany I organized a concert and workshops focused on modern harpsichord music. It was truly an amazing experience for me. We had the chance to work with our colleague composers and meet Gośka Isphording who is a prominent modern harpsichordist.

You are at Juilliard on a Fulbright scholarship. What is Fulbright and can you tell our readers about the application process for this prestigious scholarship?fb_img_1475965948962.jpg

The Fulbright Program is a scholarship program of grants for international exchange between Americans and the citizens of other countries. The main goal of it is to increase a mutual understanding between them. It focuses on the educational exchange, but through it the cultural and social exchange is possible as well. The application process takes some time- first one has to do some paperwork and send needed documents, the second step is an interview with the Fulbright commission. Once ready all the documents are sent to Washington DC where the final decision is made.

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What is your favorite aspect of being a Juilliard student? What is the most challenging?

Being a Juilliard student is like participating in a special mission. It is very intense and demanding, but also very adventurous and rewarding. People studying and working here are fascinating and the kind of energy one experiences here is very specific. Juilliard is like New York – diverse, charismatic, but not always easy to be in.

 

Juilliard students are very busy. What do you like to do or where do you like to go to relax and de-stress?

I love discovering New York every free moment I’m given. I take long walks simply wandering around. I like to observe people and birds in Central Park. I go to Polish restaurants in Brooklyn. I write songs. And I try spend as much time as I can with my beloved boyfriend.

You recently went on a tour in India with Juilliard415 (https://www.juilliard.edu/music/historical-performance/performance-opportunities). Can you describe your experience? What were your impressions of India?

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The tour in India was a very interesting experience for me. I always dreamed about going there so I couldn’t believe my luck. We visited Delhi, Mumbai, Agra and Chennai- cities very different from each other which gave us a wider picture of this country.  It is colorful and rich in tradition and monuments. We had the chance to see a world miracle – Taj Mahal which is breathtaking and hard to describe with words. Indian people are very open and warm – we had the opportunity to participate in “Holi” which is a spring festival also called “festival of colors” where people smear each other with colours and celebrate on the streets.  The moments I enjoyed the most was our short cooperation with the Songbound children choir (https://www.songbound.com/) and our concerts which were very warmly welcomed. I also have to admit that Reena Esmail’s (http://www.reenaesmail.com/) piece “This Love Between Us” which was a newly commissioned piece performed during that tour, will stay in my ears forever.

You were born and raised in Poland, studied music in Hamburg, Germany and New York City, and recently toured in India. Have you had the chance to travel to any other countries for professional or personal reasons? If so, do you have a favorite destination? IMG_2032

When I was younger I used to travel with my family during summer vacation, mainly to Italy and France. I adored all the little cities full of sun and cicadas, the landscape with olive trees and vineyards. My favourite were two islands – French Corsica and Italian Sicily, the cultural mix and temperament of the native people there intrigued me a lot.  My family and I spent also some time in Austria and the Czech Republic.

Can you tell our readers a little bit about your home city of Krakow, Poland?

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I was born in Krakow, but my parents and I moved to Warsaw shortly after my birth. So my heart belongs to Warsaw more although Krakow is a very important place for me too.  It is a cozy city with an amazing Old Town, many nice cafes and bars, little cinemas and theaters. It was formally the capital of Poland so there is a beautiful royal castle called Wawel. As a young girl I was very much influenced of Krakow’s legends. Warsaw was totally destroyed by the Germans during World War II, its reconstruction was almost a miracle. Warsaw has a very charming Old Town, but its more modern places are very nice too. My favourite spot is Lazienki Park – a royal, big park where I spent many sunny afternoons of my childhood. I love my district too – Stary Mokotow which is very calm, green and picturesque. Near the place I live there is a little cinema “Iluzjon” where I saw my first movie-  “The Lion King”.

Do you feel there are significant cultural differences between Polish and American culture? In your opinion, what are some of these differences? What are some of the similarities?

Both Polish and American people are very warm and spontaneous. We are also both courageous and ready to defend our opinions. The only difference I noticed is that Polish people are much more openly critical towards themselves and others than Americans. We usually don’t hide our emotions, no matter if they are positive or negative, which makes us very easy to understand.

Other than family and friends, what do you miss most about Poland?

I have the ability to visit places I love mentally, so I don’t miss Poland because I spend there a lot of my “inner” time there. I’m under the impression that I never really left it and it is always with me. There is some poetic charm about Poland that is much more spiritual then physical.

Where do you see yourself this time next year after you graduate from Juilliard?

It think I will be in Poland attending doctoral studies, developing my performing skills and travelling around the world looking for inspiration and people to make music with.

Is there anything else you would like to share with our readers?

I would like to express my gratitude to all the people who helped me throughout my education – my family, my boyfriend, my friends, my dear teachers. Without them I would never achieve my goals and probably would never have the chance to study at Juilliard. I would like to thank also the Fulbright Program – it is a big honor for me to be a Fulbright Scholar and I will never forget their support. And finally I would like to express my gratitude to Bruce and Suzie Kovner who sponsor Historical Performance studies at Juilliard. I would like also to highly recommend to everyone who is eager to gain more knowledge and skill in early music performance to join the Historical Performance program, which is very unique and valuable.

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